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Posted Monday, March 09th, 2015 by

yorkshire-dalesblog

 

Steeped in history and intrigue, the Yorkshire Dales are a fascinating point in the English landscape.

 

From wildlife to untamed natural beauty, there is so much to enjoy in this enchanting place.

 

Established in 1954, the dales cover an area of 1,762 square kilometres (680 square miles). They straddle the central Pennines in North Yorkshire and Cumbria and are North East of Manchester and directly North of Leeds and Bradford. The area is large and easy to locate.

 

The dales offer the largest area of nationally and internationally important habitats in the country. The wildflower rich hay meadows, pastures in the dale bottoms and the northern moorland edges, are so important for wading birds. The windswept uplands with their bogs and heathery hillsides, offer a home for native creatures and insects alike.

 

The south of the national park, displays one of the best examples in Britain of classic limestone, with its crags, pavements and intricate cave systems.

 

Unbeknown to many, is the fact that this landscape is shaped by ice, with significant glacial and post-glacial features, notably drumlin fields and the post-glacial lakes of Semerwater and Malham Tarn.

 

There are also some amazing waterfalls such as Hardraw Force with its 90ft single drop and Thornton Force with its erratic streams, unlike any other waterfall. The bodies of water in the Dales, combine to create some enchanting acoustics.

 

1024Hardraw-Force-blog

 

The Yorkshire Dales have inspired artists and poets for centuries, it truly is a special place. The tranquility is immeasurable but if you really want to absorb some captivating beauty, visit it at night, when the lack of pollution enables the night to retain its darkness, allowing the moon and stars to fully sparkle.

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Posted Monday, March 02nd, 2015 by

Aquariumblog

 

Well worth a visit during your stay at the Beech Hill, is the Lakes Aquarium on the shores of Lake Windermere. Situated on the southern shore of Lake Windermere at Lakeside, Newby Bridge, Cumbria, the premises are easy to find. Just follow the quirky fish symbols along the A590 to Newby Bridge, which are clearly signposted from junction 36, off the M6.

 

You can buy tickets online up to 30 days in advance, adult tickets are only £5.95 and children (aged 3-15yrs) pay £3.95, plus there are further discounts on family tickets. There is the option of buying tickets on the day.

 

The aquarium is a great place for kids and adults alike. The children can get up close and personal with all manner of bugs, reptiles and other amazing creatures. As you wonder through the oceanic rooms, you can see all kinds of creature features, such as the the daily otter talk and feed. Watch as the trainers interact with these fascinating sea creatures, that love to perform. Head on over to the duck displays and watch them dive into the lake tunnels, from 11am daily.

 

Right next to the aquarium are some great spots to grab a bite to eat. 1872 is an exciting shopping and eating experience, right next to the pier.  Not only is there the chance to grab a tasty spot of lunch, you can also browse the well stocked gift shop! The gift shop is great place for picking up a bespoke ornament, with many of the gifts made by local artists with materials sourced from the nearby area.

 

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Posted Monday, February 23rd, 2015 by

Blogwordsworthhouse-c1748

 

Step back in time to the 1770s with a visit to William Wordsworth’s childhood home. William Wordsworth’s House and Garden, in the Cumbrian town of Cockermouth, is the birthplace of the great 19th century English poet William Wordsworth.

 

Preserved in its original form, the house is a living and breathing time capsule of 19th century rural England. It invites visitors to gaze into a window of what life was like for Wordsworth and his family, in their small cottage home.

 

The beautiful Georgian home is these days populated by waves of tourists, being shown around the building by guides in authentic period costumes.

 

Further to the historic touches, the house includes a real log fire, traditional furniture and even the sorts of food William and his wife would have consumed, laid out on a large oak dining table. Ink and quills are laid out in the reception area, should you be inspired to write your own legendary prose and poems. There are parlour games and instruments from Wordsworth’s time, for you to inspect and also try.

 

Good news if you are coming with kids, the children’s bedroom is full of toys and dressing up clothes and in the Wordsworth’s bedroom there are books and games to enjoy. For all you fans of the occult, there is even a ghost that haunts the cellar if legend proves to be true.

 

A man so renowned for his love of nature would understandably have kept a spotless and beautiful garden, two centuries later in the yard out yonder nothing much has changed.

 

A visit to Wordsworth’s home is well worth it, it’s a great day trip to venture out on, during your stay with us here at Beech Hill. For more information visit the National Trust Website.

 

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