Tag-Archive for »Special Events«

Posted Monday, March 02nd, 2015 by

Aquariumblog

 

Well worth a visit during your stay at the Beech Hill, is the Lakes Aquarium on the shores of Lake Windermere. Situated on the southern shore of Lake Windermere at Lakeside, Newby Bridge, Cumbria, the premises are easy to find. Just follow the quirky fish symbols along the A590 to Newby Bridge, which are clearly signposted from junction 36, off the M6.

 

You can buy tickets online up to 30 days in advance, adult tickets are only £5.95 and children (aged 3-15yrs) pay £3.95, plus there are further discounts on family tickets. There is the option of buying tickets on the day.

 

The aquarium is a great place for kids and adults alike. The children can get up close and personal with all manner of bugs, reptiles and other amazing creatures. As you wonder through the oceanic rooms, you can see all kinds of creature features, such as the the daily otter talk and feed. Watch as the trainers interact with these fascinating sea creatures, that love to perform. Head on over to the duck displays and watch them dive into the lake tunnels, from 11am daily.

 

Right next to the aquarium are some great spots to grab a bite to eat. 1872 is an exciting shopping and eating experience, right next to the pier.  Not only is there the chance to grab a tasty spot of lunch, you can also browse the well stocked gift shop! The gift shop is great place for picking up a bespoke ornament, with many of the gifts made by local artists with materials sourced from the nearby area.

 

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Posted Monday, February 23rd, 2015 by

Blogwordsworthhouse-c1748

 

Step back in time to the 1770s with a visit to William Wordsworth’s childhood home. William Wordsworth’s House and Garden, in the Cumbrian town of Cockermouth, is the birthplace of the great 19th century English poet William Wordsworth.

 

Preserved in its original form, the house is a living and breathing time capsule of 19th century rural England. It invites visitors to gaze into a window of what life was like for Wordsworth and his family, in their small cottage home.

 

The beautiful Georgian home is these days populated by waves of tourists, being shown around the building by guides in authentic period costumes.

 

Further to the historic touches, the house includes a real log fire, traditional furniture and even the sorts of food William and his wife would have consumed, laid out on a large oak dining table. Ink and quills are laid out in the reception area, should you be inspired to write your own legendary prose and poems. There are parlour games and instruments from Wordsworth’s time, for you to inspect and also try.

 

Good news if you are coming with kids, the children’s bedroom is full of toys and dressing up clothes and in the Wordsworth’s bedroom there are books and games to enjoy. For all you fans of the occult, there is even a ghost that haunts the cellar if legend proves to be true.

 

A man so renowned for his love of nature would understandably have kept a spotless and beautiful garden, two centuries later in the yard out yonder nothing much has changed.

 

A visit to Wordsworth’s home is well worth it, it’s a great day trip to venture out on, during your stay with us here at Beech Hill. For more information visit the National Trust Website.

 

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Posted Wednesday, February 18th, 2015 by

Quirky-Blog

 

The Lake District is steeped in myths and legends. Its hallowed grounds are littered with notorious characters.

 

The Caveman of Borrowdale

 

Millican Dalton, known as the Caveman of Borrowdale, was originally a London stockbroker but traded in his life in the Big Smoke for a quieter rural existence. When he first arrived in the Lake District in the early 20th century, he lived off the land, dwelling in a small tent. He later moved to a more permanent address inside a cave near Castle Crag in Borrowdale. He became one of the area’s most well-known mountain guides, until he passed away at the age of 79.

 

Fair Maid of Buttermere

 

Known to some as Mary Robinson, the Fair Maid of Buttermere was in fact the innkeeper’s daughter at The Fish Hotel in Buttermere. Joseph Palmer famously wrote a poem about her that brought hoards of young men to the area, seeking to catch a glimpse of the notorious beauty. She was even mentioned in Wordsworth’s poem “The Prelude”.

 

A few years later, a hotel guest introduced himself to Mary as Colonel Alexander Hope, an MP and brother to an Earl. They married later that year. Mary’s husband turned out to a debt-riddled bigamist liar and he was promptly charged with fraud. His punishment was a public execution.

 

St Bega

 

St Bega was the daughter of a seventh century Irish chieftain. She fled Ireland to avoid marrying a Norse prince chosen by her father, as she had her heart set on devoting her life to God.  Legend is that when she landed on these shores, she brought with her a healing bracelet that could cure a multitude of diseases.

A small church lying in a beautiful position on the edge of the Mirehouse estate by Bassenthwaite Lake is named after St Bega.

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